Dry eye patients: the multistep approach

AOA logoDry eye patients: the multistep approach

When faced with a challenging dry eye patient, there are a number of key steps to take to ensure the best management and a happy patient, said Penny A. Asbell, MD, on Saturday at the Cornea Subspecialty Day.

These steps are:

-Listen: What is the complaint? What is the patient using? What therapies have been tried in the past and for how long?
-Rule out the use of the preservative benzalkonium chloride (BAK).
-Evaluate the patient for systemic diseases, including diabetes and Sjögren syndrome.
-Use keratography to measure tear breakup time, redness, and meibomian gland dysfunction.
-Examine the lids.
-Stop the patient’s current eyedrops and treat with the appropriate combination of cyclosporine, topical low-dose steroids, Lacriserts, autologous serum, or scleral contact lenses.—Mark Simborg

AAO Meeting 2013 (Cornea Subspecialty Day) (851)

Presbyopia treatments abound, but no clear standard

AOA logoPresbyopia treatments abound, but no clear standard

Corneal inlays, accommodating IOLs, and multifocal IOLs are all potential treatments for the correction of presbyopia, but none are ideal and ongoing improvements are needed, according to a panel discussion.

During Refractive Subspecialty Day, George O. Waring, III, MD, FACS served as judge with Daniel S. Durrie, MD, Jack T. Holladay, MD, MSEE, FACS, and Richard L. Lindstrom, MD, serving as jury members held court to put presbyopia surgery on trial.

There are three corneal inlays under (more…) (457)

Femto vs. phaco: technology trumps tradition

AOA logoFemto vs. phaco: technology trumps tradition (News from AAO meeting)

In a mock trial, complete with Eric D. Donnenfeld, MD, as a bewigged judge, it was decided that phacoemulsification cataract surgery will inevitably be replaced by laser. But many cataract surgeons still hold a place in their hearts—and their offices—for phaco, at least until femtosecond technology (more…) (685)

Special Award for Prof. Dr S.Natarajan at AAO meet 2013

It is a great moment to rejoice as Prof Dr S. Natarajan is being awarded with awards which includes the “Special recogniion award and Achievement award” for Contribution for Ophthalmology world wide and Leadership programme by President, American academy of ophthalmology on 17th Nov. 2013 at New Orleans, USA. There is slide show on Prof Natarajan during Desert reception on 16 th Nov. 2013

Dr Sarbjit Singh & All members of AOA

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Triamcinolone acetonide can reduce inflammation after phacotrabeculectomy

AOA logo Triamcinolone acetonide can reduce inflammation after phacotrabeculectomy

Investigators randomized 126 patients undergoing combined trabeculectomy and cataract surgery to receive intracameral triamcinolone acetonide (0.5 mg, 1.0 mg or 2.0 mg) or no injection. They found that eyes treated with triamcinolone acetonide had better visual acuity and less anterior chamber inflammation than the control eyes, with 1.0 mg providing the best postoperative result.

Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery, November 2013 (823)

Children Born Prematurely Face Up To A 19 Times Greater Risk Of Retinal Detachment Later In Life

AO Logo Children Born Prematurely Face Up To A 19 Times Greater Risk Of Retinal Detachment Later In Life

First large population-based study investigating long-term risks supports need for ophthalmologic follow-up of children and adults born before 32 weeks of gestation

SAN FRANCISCO – Nov. 7, 2013 – Children born extremely prematurely have up to a 19 times greater risk of retinal detachment later in life than peers born at term, according to a Swedish study published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. In the first large population-based, long-term investigation of the association between preterm birth and later retinal detachment, (more…) (944)

Increase in amount of patching for residual amblyopia improves visual acuity

AO Logo Increase in amount of patching for residual amblyopia improves visual acuity

An increase to 6 hours of daily patching for residual amblyopia yielded greater improvement in visual acuity than continuing with 2 hours of daily patching.
A prospective, randomized, multicenter study included 169 children between the ages of 3 years up to 8 years with stable residual amblyopia after 12 weeks of 2-hour daily patching.

Patients were randomly selected to either continue 2 hours of daily patching or increase patching to 6 hours daily. (more…) (251)

Intracameral bevacizumab as an adjunct to trabeculectomy

AO Logo Intracameral bevacizumab as an adjunct to trabeculectomy
Author(s): Vandewalle E, Abegão Pinto L, Van Bergen T, Spielberg L, Fieuws S, Moons L, Spileers W, Zeyen T, Stalmans I
Treatments discussed: bevacizumab
AIMS To investigate the efficacy and safety of a single intracameral bevacizumab injection to improve the outcome of trabeculectomy.

METHODS A 12-month, prospective, randomised, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial. Patients with medically uncontrolled open-angle glaucoma scheduled for a primary trabeculectomy were recruited and randomised to receive 50 µL of either bevacizumab (1.25 mg) or placebo (balanced salt solution) peroperatively. (more…) (298)

Review of refractive treatment outcomes in high myopes

AO Logo Review of refractive treatment outcomes in high myopes:

This retrospective review included 77 high myopes (≥ -6.0 D) who underwent LASIK, PRK or phakic IOL implantation with either the Staar Implantable Collamer Lens or Alcon Cachet. At one year follow-up, patients in all four treatment groups were near emmetropic and had good uncorrected distance vision. All groups showed a good safety profile with minimal endothelial cell loss and no intraoperative and postoperative vision-threatening complications. However, there was an increase in spherical and higher order aberrations in the laser groups.

Philippine Journal of Ophthalmology, January /June 2013 (864)

Allergic conjunctivitis responds to topical cyclosporine

AO Logo Allergic conjunctivitis responds to topical cyclosporine

Investigators performed a meta-analysis to assess the efficacy and safety of topical cyclosporine compared with placebo for treating allergic conjunctivitis. At two weeks or longer of follow-up, topical cyclosporine produced a statistically significant improvement in signs and symptoms, and its safety profile was comparable to that of placebo. Additionally, they suggest that it may also have a role in weaning corticosteroid-dependent allergic conjunctivitis patients from their steroid eye drops, though the evidence was limited.

Ophthalmology, November 2013
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